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November 13, 2007

Mastodons

Filed under: Arlo and Janis, Bill Bickel, CIDU, comic strips, comics, humor, mastodons — Cidu Bill @ 1:18 am

mastodons.gif
So… He’s saying he’d rather be eating mastodons? Or not?

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12 Comments »

  1. Can you imagine trying to clean a mastodon? And you have to work fast because you need to get everything usable off the animal before it starts to rot (or before the rest of the animal kingdom starts closing in for their share). On the other hand, cleaning a whale is probably just as bad, and thoroughly bigger. A whale-mammoth-buffalo turducken would be terrificaly impressive, though.

    Comment by Christian — November 13, 2007 @ 2:54 am

  2. I think he’s saying that mastodons eventually became extinct, but there doesn’t seem to be any chance of running out of chickens. I can’t imagine why he’s implying that humans ate mastodons into extinction.

    Comment by brien — November 13, 2007 @ 5:49 am

  3. I think Arlo is saying he would prefer to grill beef, as red meat is more macho than chicken.

    Comment by Blinky the Wonder Wombat — November 13, 2007 @ 6:18 am

  4. It’s a widely-held belief that humans hunted mastodons to extinction.
    Wikipedia currently says, “Paleontologists are still trying to determine what role, if any, the early human settlers of North America played in the extinction of the mastodon.”

    Comment by Morris Keesan — November 13, 2007 @ 9:55 am

  5. Many scientists believe (correctly, in my view) that megafauna such as mastodons and mammoths were hunted to extinction for food by humans. But chickens, which individually are much smaller than mastodons, are a more enduring source of meat, to a point where it’s too much of a good thing if you happen to be tired to chicken.

    Comment by John — November 13, 2007 @ 10:03 am

  6. Sorry, “if you happen to be tired OF chicken.”

    Comment by John — November 13, 2007 @ 10:04 am

  7. Yep, John nailed it. I know my dad grew up in a family that ate so much chicken, that to this day (he’s 67) he won’t eat it unless he has to.

    Comment by BF — November 13, 2007 @ 3:01 pm

  8. Wow, I had no idea. Maybe the existence of mastodon factory farms would have been a boon to their species.

    Comment by brien — November 14, 2007 @ 5:08 am

  9. Another widely held belief: mastodon tasted like chicken. Or perhaps its the other way around: chicken is ubiquitous because it satisfies that primal craving for a good slab of mastodon.

    Comment by Ooten Aboot — November 14, 2007 @ 5:58 am

  10. I think Arlo’s thinking here is along the lines of the mastodon being such a huge animal. If you hunted one, the meat would last you for maybe a week until it was too rotten to eat. Additionally, there were far, far less people around to eat that meat back then. Today, however, there are billions of people, many of whom eat chicken every day. Besides that, chickens are very small. I’ve eaten a whole chicken before and still had room for the roll it came with, so I’m sure one family can polish off one without much trouble. Despite this, we never seem to have any chicken shortages ever.

    Comment by bAT L. — November 15, 2007 @ 12:18 am

  11. I forgot to mention we also eat chicken eggs! That’s millions of potential chickens being eaten every day, technically speaking. I remember something about grocery store eggs being not potential chickens, but if the chickens weren’t laying eggs for stores, they could have been laying eggs for more chickens instead.

    Comment by bAT L. — November 15, 2007 @ 12:20 am

  12. I agree with #3 above . . . AND I think he’s just sick of chicken . . . it’s not much more complicated than that.

    does anybody know the a.a. milne “rice pudding” poem? (nobody I ask ever does.) It’s the same concept.

    Comment by laterain — November 15, 2007 @ 8:55 am


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