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November 23, 2007

Clams

Filed under: Bill Bickel, CIDU, clams, comic strips, comics, Crankshaft, humor, Thanksgiving, Tom Batiuk — Cidu Bill @ 9:31 am

crankshaft-clams.gif

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14 Comments »

  1. Because “redneck” doesn’t sound enough like “littleneck”?

    Comment by Jon88 — November 23, 2007 @ 1:10 pm

  2. It may also be a comment on the texture of the cooked clams.

    Comment by Dave Van Domelen — November 23, 2007 @ 2:58 pm

  3. There is such a thing as rubberneck clams, as it happens.

    Comment by Cidu Bill — November 23, 2007 @ 3:42 pm

  4. Well, I’ve never heard of rubberneck clams–which doesn’t mean they don’t exist. But anyway, is that slang for something else, or did Crankshaft toss out another “old man malapropism”? He must have meant something other than what he actually said because a) it’s the only line in the strip, so it must be the punchline, and b) there’s no other explanation for the variety of looks he is getting from the family as a result (although, to be fair, some of them look like they’re looking at us.)

    Comment by Jim M. — November 23, 2007 @ 5:02 pm

  5. I assumed they were littleneck clams, poorly cooked so as to be rubbery.

    Comment by Mark Jackson — November 23, 2007 @ 8:08 pm

  6. Okay, the curmudgeon returns: I’d never heard of littleneck clams, either…but at least it “googled”. On the other hand, the curmudgeon in me feels that you shouldn’t have to do an internet search to make a comic strip accessible. On the other, other hand, not everybody is going to “get” every punchline. Oh, well. Anyway, my REAL point is: thanks, Mark; your comment makes the comic make sense.

    Comment by Jim M. — November 24, 2007 @ 1:53 am

  7. “There is such a thing as rubberneck clams, as it happens.”

    “I’d never heard of littleneck clams, either…but at least it ‘googled’.”

    I don’t think there is a such thing. Besides the fact that I’ve never heard of them (which doesn’t count for as much as I’d like to think it does), the google search I did returned just 5 hits (compared to 45,700 for little-neck)and in one of them the site’s author claims the term as his own.

    Comment by Robverb — November 24, 2007 @ 10:50 am

  8. “Rubbernecking” is when you slow the car down and take a long look at the horrible car wreck as you drive by. My guess is that the clams were so badly cooked that they’re comparable to messy car accident victims.

    Comment by eeyore19 — November 24, 2007 @ 1:15 pm

  9. “Rubbernecking” is what you do when you watch a car accident as you drive past.

    I figured it was a reference to all of the time Cranky spends driving — either as the rubbernecker or as the object of rubbernecking.

    Comment by PepperjackCandy — November 24, 2007 @ 1:16 pm

  10. Americans eat clams at Thanksgiving? Cooked clams?

    That’s worse than that green-bean-and-fried-onion monstrosity I keep hearing about. Or “sweet potato pie”. Urgh.

    Comment by Charlene — November 25, 2007 @ 12:40 am

  11. Seriously must lay off the sweet potato pie. It is the stuff of the gods.

    Comment by dd — November 25, 2007 @ 11:33 pm

  12. Maybe the turkey was so poorly cooked, he thought it was clams.

    Comment by Winman — November 26, 2007 @ 11:59 am

  13. Clams at Thanksgiving is a New England tradition. I still don’t understand the joke, but we’re probably supposed to assume that there are actually clams there.

    Comment by Bill — November 26, 2007 @ 6:29 pm

  14. And as we drove down I-70 coming home from Thanksgiving, we passed an accident and slowed down to make sure we got by safely. My daughter yelled, “Stop chicken-necking!” – which had nothing to do with clams, but did provoke general hilarity in the car.

    Comment by Dan V — November 26, 2007 @ 7:19 pm


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